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Herald Sun - Living in Harmony Reaps Rewards

heraldsun 19 dec 2010
VICTORIAN home owners and buyers are increasingly turning to the age-old practice of feng shui when finding and setting up home. 

The Chinese have long believed the design and decor of a home can bring its occupants financial prosperity, health and good luck. Feng shui has been building in popularity in the West since the 1990s and its consultants here said business was booming, especially in the eastern suburbs, the destination of choice for many Asian buyers moving to Australia. The practice strives to use the physical environment to create balance and harmony in a home, inviting in positive energy and bringing with it success, romance, health and money. Philip Webb Real Estate principal Philip Webb said about one in five clients he dealt with was seeking properties with good feng shui. "You can have a beautiful house at the right price and in a fantastic area, but if the feng shui isn't right they certainly won't buy it," Mr Webb said.

He said that with 20 per cent of people inquiring about properties through his offices in Doncaster, Ringwood and Mitcham being born in Asia, he would be foolish not to take Chinese superstitions on board. "There are certain auspicious street numbers that are more attractive than others. For example, four is a number that refers to death whereas the number eight refers to luck, prosperity and longevity," Mr Webb said. "My car's number plate has 8888 so people believe I'm very lucky to deal with and why rock the system?" Janene Laird, of Shen-Chi Feng-Shui, said the popularity of suburbs such as Doncaster and North Balwyn among Asian buyers could be explained by the ancient art form.

 

"Between February 2004 and February 2024 we are in the age of eight, which means the energy is coming from the northeast, so I would imagine that the northeastern suburbs would be very attractive because of that," Ms Laird said.  Ms Laird is one of a growing number of feng shui consultants charging a fee of $300 to $600 to help people find, renovate, design or decorate their homes. She said that central to feng shui were the themes of water and mountains.  "A classic example is Hong Kong, which fronts the water on Victoria Harbour and has mountains towering over the rear of the city," Ms Laird said.  "Open water brings positive energy and opportunities for prosperity and the mountains contain that energy, so it doesn't just pass on by."

 

Ms Laird listed dos and don'ts for people wanting to improve their lives with positive energy:

 

DO

1. Select a home on a relatively quiet street because the flow of traffic is slower and less frequent, enabling the energy to enter the house more easily, bringing prosperity to the occupants.

2. Select a property with an open area at the front of the house. This allows the energy to settle and accumulate in the front yard while a tall form at the rear of the house - like a hill, tall trees or a two-storey house - helps to contain the precious life force energy.

3. Select a home that has good natural lighting and ventilation to ensure that the energy always remains fresh and vital.

4. Select a home with a fairly open floor plan and wide passageways to allows energy to circulate easily throughout the home.

5. Select a home that is more regular in shape - such as a square or rectangle - to allow energy to be distributed easily throughout the house.

 

DON'T

1. Avoid properties located on busy thoroughfares because the movement stops energy from entering the property, making opportunities for prosperity simply pass on by.

2. Avoid a home that has a T-intersection or large pole directly in line with your front door - that creates a "poison arrow" directing harmful energy towards the entrance of the home.

3. Avoid a home where the front door is directly in line with the back door because the energy goes in one door and out the other and takes your money and opportunities with it.

4. Avoid a home where the previous occupants have a history of bad luck, including divorce, fatal illness or financial troubles.

5. Avoid a home with the kitchen in the centre of the building - this area is considered to be the heart of the home and having a kitchen there can create instability and continuing health problems.

Eastern suburbs architect Ian Cole, of Cole and Izzo, said regardless of energy flow, feng shui simply made good design sense.

 

"We always use the principles of feng shui as a good design check because it is very logical," Mr Cole said.

"Ten years ago no one knew what it was all about, but now a lot of people are aware and, interestingly, there are just as many people from a European background interested in it as there are Asian people.

"More often than not it is the young people driving the trend."

 

* The living area photographed in this article is by Feng Shui consultant and designer Jane Langof.

VICTORIAN home owners and buyers are increasingly turning to the age-old practice of feng shui when finding and setting up home. 

 

The Chinese have long believed the design and decor of a home can bring its occupants financial prosperity, health and good luck. Feng shui has been building in popularity in the West since the 1990s and its consultants here said business was booming, especially in the eastern suburbs, the destination of choice for many Asian buyers moving to Australia. The practice strives to use the physical environment to create balance and harmony in a home, inviting in positive energy and bringing with it success, romance, health and money. Philip Webb Real Estate principal Philip Webb said about one in five clients he dealt with was seeking properties with good feng shui. "You can have a beautiful house at the right price and in a fantastic area, but if the feng shui isn't right they certainly won't buy it," Mr Webb said.

 

He said that with 20 per cent of people inquiring about properties through his offices in Doncaster, Ringwood and Mitcham being born in Asia, he would be foolish not to take Chinese superstitions on board. "There are certain auspicious street numbers that are more attractive than others. For example, four is a number that refers to death whereas the number eight refers to luck, prosperity and longevity," Mr Webb said. "My car's number plate has 8888 so people believe I'm very lucky to deal with and why rock the system?" Janene Laird, of Shen-Chi Feng-Shui, said the popularity of suburbs such as Doncaster and North Balwyn among Asian buyers could be explained by the ancient art form.

 

"Between February 2004 and February 2024 we are in the age of eight, which means the energy is coming from the northeast, so I would imagine that the northeastern suburbs would be very attractive because of that," Ms Laird said.  Ms Laird is one of a growing number of feng shui consultants charging a fee of $300 to $600 to help people find, renovate, design or decorate their homes. She said that central to feng shui were the themes of water and mountains.  "A classic example is Hong Kong, which fronts the water on Victoria Harbour and has mountains towering over the rear of the city," Ms Laird said.  "Open water brings positive energy and opportunities for prosperity and the mountains contain that energy, so it doesn't just pass on by."

 

Ms Laird listed dos and don'ts for people wanting to improve their lives with positive energy:

 

DO

1. Select a home on a relatively quiet street because the flow of traffic is slower and less frequent, enabling the energy to enter the house more easily, bringing prosperity to the occupants.

2. Select a property with an open area at the front of the house. This allows the energy to settle and accumulate in the front yard while a tall form at the rear of the house - like a hill, tall trees or a two-storey house - helps to contain the precious life force energy.

3. Select a home that has good natural lighting and ventilation to ensure that the energy always remains fresh and vital.

4. Select a home with a fairly open floor plan and wide passageways to allows energy to circulate easily throughout the home.

5. Select a home that is more regular in shape - such as a square or rectangle - to allow energy to be distributed easily throughout the house.

 

DON'T

1. Avoid properties located on busy thoroughfares because the movement stops energy from entering the property, making opportunities for prosperity simply pass on by.

2. Avoid a home that has a T-intersection or large pole directly in line with your front door - that creates a "poison arrow" directing harmful energy towards the entrance of the home.

3. Avoid a home where the front door is directly in line with the back door because the energy goes in one door and out the other and takes your money and opportunities with it.

4. Avoid a home where the previous occupants have a history of bad luck, including divorce, fatal illness or financial troubles.

5. Avoid a home with the kitchen in the centre of the building - this area is considered to be the heart of the home and having a kitchen there can create instability and continuing health problems.

Eastern suburbs architect Ian Cole, of Cole and Izzo, said regardless of energy flow, feng shui simply made good design sense.

 

"We always use the principles of feng shui as a good design check because it is very logical," Mr Cole said.

"Ten years ago no one knew what it was all about, but now a lot of people are aware and, interestingly, there are just as many people from a European background interested in it as there are Asian people.

"More often than not it is the young people driving the trend."

 

* The living area photographed in this article is by Feng Shui consultant and designer Jane Langof.

Last modified on Tuesday, 05 May 2015 11:10
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